A Super Bowl Champion’s Guide to Health and Safety Performance

A Super Bowl Champion’s Guide to Health and Safety Performance

In what could only be described as a dominant performance, the Seattle Seahawks won Super Bowl XLVIII.

They outperformed the Denver Broncos in every phase of the game. The Seahawks defense issued an undeniable beat down of Peyton Manning’s offense (a record breaking and perhaps greatest offense in the history of the NFL, no less). The Seahawks offense and special teams had their way with Denver’s defensive and special teams units the entire game.

On that night, it didn’t matter who they were playing — the Seattle Seahawks were mentally, physically and emotionally superior to any team in the world. They were unstoppable.

So what set them down the path to a Pete Carroll Gatorade bath, a shining Vince Lombardi trophy and the infamous trip to Disney World?

And what can we learn about workplace performance from a high-performing Super Bowl championship team?

That’s what we’re about to explore together.

Let’s get started.

A Winning Approach to Human Performance

“I wanted to find out if we went to the NFL and really took care of guys, really cared about each and every individual, what would happen?”

– Pete Carroll

What happened was a Super Bowl championship. It turns out that caring (really caring) for each person in the organization helped them meet their goals. The idea is that happier and healthier players make for better players.

From yoga classes, to meditation meetings, to having a DJ at practice, to saying “thank you” after each player interview, to discouraging yelling and swearing, Pete Carroll and the Seahawks do things a little differently from other teams around the league. Their approach to human performance considers all facets of complex, multi-dimensional human beings. By helping their players build themselves up mentally, physically and emotionally with positive habits and language, they are able to improve individual and team performance.

It is a simple and timeless philosophy – care about your people enough to help them be the best they can be.

“Helping people be the best they can be — it doesn’t matter what you’re talking about. Football, or whether you‘re talking about business, or talking about families — the language and the intent and doing everything you can to help them. I can understand why that does resonate, and I’m very excited about that, because I know that the message goes beyond football.”

– Pete Carroll

A Winning Approach to Human Performance in the Workplace

The message certainly goes beyond football and into the workplace. Caring about your people enough to help them be the best they can be is an applicable philosophy in all areas of life.

Happier, healthier people make for better employees, husbands, wives, brothers, sisters, you name it.

What if …

What if we cared about our people enough to help them be the best they can be?

What if we started treating the employees at our companies like they were a valued family member?

What if we treated employees like the professional (industrial) athletes that they are?

People want to belong to something that matters. They want to be respected and appreciated and cared for.

If they do feel that way, you’ll get their loyalty, respect and their best work.

This is not just an idea for your next safety slogan — it’s a real way to impact the entire company, and to help it perform at a Super Bowl championship caliber level.

Care about your industrial athletes enough to help them be the best they can be.

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